Tony Winyard

360 Degrees to Healthspan: A Proactive Perspective-episode 250

Welcome to a special milestone episode of The Art of Living Proactively podcast, where host Tony Winyard dives into an insightful conversation with Helena Holrick. In this 250th episode, Tony shares his journey, talking about his dedication to fostering whole person health and his new vision, “360 Degrees of Healthspan”. They discuss the impactful centenarian decathlon, the importance of breathing for overall health, and Tony’s passion for habit formation and confidence-building. From exploring diverse countries to cycling for a cause, the episode is a captivating blend of personal stories and health insights. Join us as we celebrate this milestone and gain an enriching perspective on proactive living and holistic health.

What if there was a way to not just live a long life, but to also enjoy every moment of it in the best of health? Join us on a journey of exploration as we delve into the compelling world of “360 Degrees to Healthspan” with Tony Winyard and guest, Helena Holrick.

Action Steps and Call to Action:

Are you ready to take control of your health and vitality? Here are some actionable steps inspired by “360 Degrees to Healthspan” to get you started on your journey to better living:

1. Embrace a Balanced Lifestyle:

Prioritise nutrition, quality sleep, stress management, regular movement, and mindful breathing.

2. Explore Coherent Breathing:

Try the box breathing technique to foster focus and tranquillity in your daily life.

3. Stay Informed:

Keep an eye out for Tony Winyard’s new vision, “360 Degrees of Healthspan”, for valuable insights and diverse perspectives on holistic health.

It’s time to embark on your proactive journey towards healthspan. Join us as we navigate the art of living a proactive life in the pursuit of holistic well-being.

Remember, the power is in your choices.

Stay tuned for “360 Degrees to Healthspan” – a podcast episode that might just transform the way you perceive health and longevity.

Are you ready to embrace proactive living and unlock the secrets to a long, fulfilling life?

The power lies within you.

Chapters:

01:09 Introduction and Episode Overview
01:29 Introducing the Guest Host: Helena Holrick
02:21 The Journey of the Podcast
03:47 The Art of Interviewing
04:20 Tony’s Radio Career and Interviewing Celebrities
05:06 The Evolution of Tony’s Interviewing Style
05:33 The Impact of Confidence in Interviewing
06:35 The Importance of Curiosity in Conversations
06:59 Tony’s Favorite Interview Experiences
08:16 Tony’s Work Outside Podcasting
08:38 The Importance of Habits in Achieving Goals
11:20 The Role of Health in Tony’s Life
11:31 The Impact of Family Health History
13:01 The Importance of Nutrition in Health
15:51 The Centenarian Olympics: A Health Mission
19:14 The Importance of Breathing in Health
20:29 Understanding Dysfunctional Breathing
22:36 The Role of Breathing in Stress Management
26:00 The Future of the Podcast: 360 Degrees of Health Span
26:45 Podcast Frequency and Format
27:17 Content Strategy: Blogs and E-books
27:46 Storytelling and Humor in Podcasts
28:08 The Importance of Health Education
28:41 Sharing Personal Stories
29:09 A Life-Changing Cycling Adventure
33:45 Lessons from Living in Different Countries
34:28 The Power of People and Connections
37:14 The Influence of Eastern Medicine
38:09 The Impact of Age and Attitude
45:19 The Importance of Sleep
46:57 The Power of Quotes
48:36 The Space Between Stimulus and Response
49:13 Breathwork as a Tool for Response
49:54 Developing Healthy Habits
50:25 Closing Remarks and Gratitude

Guest Bio:

Helena Holrick is a dynamic individual who dedicates her life to teaching, coaching, guiding, writing, and learning. These activities form the core of her joy and inspiration, driving her to create and contribute meaningfully. She possesses a unique gift for enlightening and encouraging people to grow and fulfill their potential. Helena views training as a crucial thread connecting her past experiences. From her early years, she has been naturally inclined towards teaching and sharing knowledge to enhance understanding and enable informed choices. Her career milestones include opening 17 restaurants with TGI Friday’s, contributing significantly to The Video Meeting company, and managing training at the London Fire Brigade. Additionally, Helena thrives when speaking to audiences or conducting workshops, where she focuses on skill development and professional advancement. On a personal note, Helena enjoys a countryside lifestyle, loves music, and owns a vast collection of books. She has diverse life experiences, including building a house in Chile and training thousands of people

Watch this episode on YouTube

Transcript

Tony Winyard – 250

Greetings. This is your host, Tony Winyard welcoming you to a very special 250th episode of The Art of Living Proactively podcast. Today I hathee a delightful privilege of being the interviewee, rather than the interviewer, with the talented Helena Holrick taking the reigns. She will be gently grilling me about the Genesis of this podcast, my approach to interviewing and the habits I’m cultivating. I’ll also reveal an exciting rebrand happening in episode 251 next week.

So strap in for an enthralling ride into the future of this podcast. There may even be some surprising stories from my globe- trotting past sprinkled into give a glimpse into what shaped my perspectives. So hope you enjoy this celebratory episode. It promises to be a riveting and rewarding one. When it finishes

I would love for you to leave comments on the YouTube channel about what most intrigued or inspired you. And now without further delay, let’s hand. The mic over to Halena and dive right in.

 

[00:01:09] Introduction and Episode Overview

[00:01:11] Tony Winyard: Welcome to The Art of Living Proactively, and today is a very different episode. It’s episode 250, for one thing. I’m not actually the guest on this episode, where usually I’m the host. Oh, sorry, I’m not actually the host on this episode, rather, where usually I am. I’m the guest today.

[00:01:29] Helena Holrick: Yay!

[00:01:29] Introducing the Guest Host: Helena Holrick

[00:01:29] Tony Winyard: And the host is, well, let me introduce you to Helena Holrick. And any of you who’ve been listening to my podcast for quite a few years, or if you’ve been listening since the beginning, I don’t know how many people there still are. But Helena was a guest about four years ago, and in probably around episode 30 ish or something along those

lines. So, um, hello Helena.

[00:01:53] Helena Holrick: Hello! It’s so nice to be here and it’s so fantastic to be able to turn the tables. And just facilitate everyone listening. You know, for those of you who are long term fans of Tony, welcome. And you’re gonna find out some, some things about Tony that you may never have known. And yet he may well have, introduced you to.

For those of you who are fairly new to Tony, hello and welcome to you as well.

[00:02:21] The Journey of the Podcast

[00:02:21] Helena Holrick: You’re about to find out something about, the, the direction that this podcast is actually taking because, Tony, you’ve been doing podcasts now for how long?

[00:02:33] Tony Winyard: It’s coming up to six years I guess, it’s over five years anyway,

[00:02:37] Helena Holrick: Yeah,

for sure. And, this episode, which starts the whole new thing, which we’ll talk about in a minute, this episode is going to be the 250th episode, which is really quite some going. Your passion and dedication to finding and then sharing with your audience, some really diverse characters is, it kind of knows no bounds.

So tell us a little bit about what inspires you to reach out to someone to put them on the show, whichever iteration of the show we’ve been going through.

[00:03:14] Tony Winyard: It’s just the whole scratch my own itch thing, you know, I just, I’m I’m so incredibly curious about so many different things. And I’ll be reading something. I mean, I just read loads and loads of books and often it will be, I’ll be reading a book and I think, ah, I should have an episode about that. And then I’ll either reach out to the author of that book, which I’ve done many times and I’ve had many authors on, or I’ll reach out to an author of another book, maybe on the same topic, or, you know, I’ve done that many a time.

[00:03:47] The Art of Interviewing

[00:03:47] Helena Holrick: And you have a particular style around how you interview people. Can you say more? Because I, I know for a fact from listening, and I know that others tell you this as well, that they just, you seem to extract quite a lot out of your guests. That just allows them to share possibly more than they anticipated.

And most of them, I know this because you and I have been in conversation, turn around and say, That was a really good interview. What, what’s your knack.

[00:04:20] Tony’s Radio Career and Interviewing Celebrities

[00:04:20] Tony Winyard: Well, so I did radio for eight years in the 90s. And I was working on a big station in Jakarta, Indonesia, which was their equivalent, of Capital radio. So it was a very big station. And there was a lot of major stars used to go and do, shows in Jakarta and like making appearances to sell their books and films.

And when I say major stars, I mean A list celebrities. And because I was the only native English speaking person on this radio station. They asked me to do these interviews. So I was interviewing people along the lines of Cindy Crawford and Steven Segal and Bon Jovi and Take That and George Benson. I mean, like some huge, huge

names, loads and loads of them.

[00:05:06] The Evolution of Tony’s Interviewing Style

[00:05:06] Tony Winyard: And initially in the early days of doing these interviews, I would do loads of research on every person and I’d come to the interview with this whole list of questions. And it, it soon, I soon realized no one actually said anything to me because they gave me complete control. The radio station were really cool with me, but I realized there wasn’t, the interviews weren’t really flowing.

It was just me asking lots of questions and it was just kind of a bit stuttery almost.

[00:05:33] The Impact of Confidence in Interviewing

[00:05:33] Tony Winyard: And then one day I was just, I don’t know, I was just sort of, I just guess confident with myself. I had enough confidence in myself. I’m not going to do any into, I’m not going to do any research for this episode. I’m just going to have a conversation and see where it goes. It was amazing. The difference was incredible. I remember that very first interview. It was a guy, any jazz aficionados may know of a guy called Bob James, who was really big in the jazz fusion world in the 70s and 80s. And I was interviewing this guy. And I really like Bob James, as it goes. And we went down all sorts of paths and, and I remember him saying to me at one point, wow, you, and actually what you just said is it basically what he said. We’ve, we’ve covered some stuff here. I haven’t, cause all he was doing all day long and many of the people I was speaking to were just doing interviews all day long with different radio stations, TV stations, newspapers, and so on. We’ve been talking about some stuff that I haven’t spoken about in any other interviews.

[00:06:35] The Importance of Curiosity in Conversations

[00:06:35] Tony Winyard: It’s, I’ve really enjoyed it and and I have had many people say that and it, I don’t, I just have a conversation with people. I don’t know where it’s going to go. I, a lot of what I ask depends on what they say.

[00:06:48] Helena Holrick: It makes complete and utter sense. And it’s great that you’ve just said that because, because, you know, well, two things pop for me and I’m like, who was your favorite?

[00:06:59] Tony’s Favorite Interview Experiences

[00:06:59] Helena Holrick: If you got free and easy with the conversations, who was your favorite? Or what was your best kind of like. question that then opens someone up in a way that you never thought it would.

[00:07:12] Tony Winyard: Oh wow, that’s a really hard question. So many. Um, who’s my favorite? I guess, oh actually no, I can answer this. My favorite. Was a guy called Bluey Maunick, who is the lead singer of Incognito.

[00:07:28] Helena Holrick: Uh huh.

[00:07:29] Tony Winyard: And he was a guest on my show when I was in Jakarta. And it’s definitely favoritism because I love his music. I love Incognito. And we also had a lot of fun, um, kind of ribbing each other because he’s a Tottenham supporter and I’m an Arsenal supporter. So we were giving each other lots of, like, ribbing as well. And it was just a real fun interview. So yeah, I really enjoyed that. So

[00:07:57] Helena Holrick: Oh, good for you. And it’s interesting because you also mentioned kind of what gives you confidence and there’s a point at which, um, one, a person gains confidence in something after having done it for a little while or having built kind of a habit around it.

[00:08:16] Tony’s Work Outside Podcasting

[00:08:16] Helena Holrick: Can you tell us a little bit about how you help?

people get confidence because I think a lot of people know you as a podcast host, but they might not know what you do outside of it. So, so expand everyone’s world a little bit around what you do and why habits are important to you and how that leads to confidence.

[00:08:38] The Importance of Habits in Achieving Goals

[00:08:38] Tony Winyard: yeah, I realized, um, we all… Every person listening to this has so many things that they want to do, but they’re not doing. And I don’t think there’s a person on earth who that doesn’t apply to. And, and so that’s, you know, there’s many habits that we wish that we were doing on a regular basis, but we’re not doing. And I’m as guilty of that as anyone, probably more so. And I was in many books. I was, well, a few years ago, I got really into deep into, I was just reading so many books around different aspects of health and nutrition and sleep and stress and so on. And as I was putting all this together and I started doing various courses, I did a breathwork course and a nutrition coach course and so on, and as I was doing all these courses and I started to sort of coach people and I realized that. People were struggling to make these into habits. They weren’t actually following through on the things that we were talking about. And I was trying to understand why. And then I happened to be reading a book called Tiny Habits. And then literally I think a light bulb went off. Ah, this is the missing piece. And what was quite strange about that was… It was almost, actually thinking about it, it was almost three years ago to this day, because what happened was, I was reading the book, it was the day before my birthday, so it would have been December the 2nd, 2020. And I was reading the book and I thought, and then it mentioned in the book, we do courses to train people to be Tiny Habits coaches. So I went online and I saw there was a course starting, oh it would have been December the 1st, because the course started the following day, which was December the 2nd. So I signed up for the course, they happened to have one space left, I went on the course, started December the 2nd. And one of the first questions they asked during the course was, um, we, we want you to answer some questions. So we’re going to start off with the, the oldest person will speak first. So, oh no, sorry, not oldest, whoever’s birthday is nearest. So we all had to say our birthdates. And I said, well, I think it’s probably going to be me, because in four hours time, it’s my birthday. So, yeah, so it’s almost exactly three years ago that, that was, yeah.

[00:11:06] Helena Holrick: Wow. And, and, you know, sort of, I, I really hear in that, that, that with the breath work, with the nutrition, I know you’ve done a whole bunch of other sort of integrative trainings around health.

[00:11:20] The Role of Health in Tony’s Life

[00:11:20] Helena Holrick: Why is health so important to you? And why is it so important for you to kind of share what you know, kind of learn about it and share?

[00:11:29] Tony Winyard: I think there’s a few things.

[00:11:31] The Impact of Family Health History

[00:11:31] Tony Winyard: One is, um, my health history in my family. A lot of people have died young in my family. Um, My, um, both my brothers died in their sort of early 50s, my dad did, my mum had, well she went blind in the, in the late 90s, and then she had various sort of cancers, she had breast cancer, it went, came back, she had to have a, a mastectomy, it went, came back, had a double mastectomy, and then she had terminal cancer, and then she passed away. One of my uncles had testicular, uh, prostate cancer, sorry. My granddad died of lung cancer, my nan died of, so cancer was very prevalent in the family. Lots of people have died and then other people have died from, from various things and so I guess it, it was just always in, you know, am I gonna die young as well?

I would, at one point I was thinking, well it’s obviously, it’s just a matter of time until I get cancer

because everyone was having cancer. So that was kind of set me off reading a lot about cancer. Initially, I was reading a lot about cancer, and the more I read, then I started sort of learning about epigenetics, which, uh, which means, no, I’m not destined to get cancer.

It’s about, it’s not just about our genes, it’s about how the environment that we’re living in and the food that we’re eating and the toxins we’re exposed to and many, many other things. So yeah, so now I know I’m not destined to get cancer. But that, initially, just reading all those books on cancer, led me to reading books on many other, many other things.

[00:13:01] The Importance of Nutrition in Health

[00:13:01] Helena Holrick: And, you know, lots of us read lots of things because we get interested in it, but you’ve taken it kind of one step further and you’ve actually placed it at the heart of Not just this podcast, but also, you know, especially because you’ve been talking about proactivity for quite some time during this particular series, but you’ve really taken the whole health effort into something that matters to you personally.

Why is that?

[00:13:31] Tony Winyard: I think that was because of the way my mum was treated by, um, the doctors who were treating her. Um, as I was learning more and more about cancer and I saw how important nutrition was, and they never ever spoke to her about nutrition. All they ever did was offer her more and more chemotherapy. and aggressive chemotherapy.

And there was all sorts of side effects, you know, losing her hair, getting flu constantly, just lots of, it just so affected her quality of life. Her quality of life just went, really went downhill. And, and it was really frustrating that she wouldn’t listen to me because I kept talking to her about nutrition, but she had that, um, that, uh, white coat syndrome.

[00:14:19] Helena Holrick: Uh huh.

[00:14:20] Tony Winyard: You know, you’d only listen to someone who’s got a white coat. And I, she’s no, I had no training in medicine. So why should she listen to me? That was kind of her

approach. And it wasn’t that she was ignoring me because my mom loved me, but I, it, it, I just found it really frustrating that the doctors would never mention anything about nutrition.

So not once did they say, you know, ask her about the food that she’s and, and it was down to the food she was eating and her diet was terrible. And, and yeah, they, they never mentioned that. And I guess it just. I don’t want anyone else to go through this. Like what are, I mean, um, a medical system in many ways, the NHS is, is amazing, but not when it comes, I mean, I’ve since met so many doctors and I’ve had loads of doctors as guests on my podcast. Um, and every doctor I’ve spoken to admits the same thing. They don’t get any training in nutrition in their seven years of medical study. Um, and yeah, it’s so important.

And so I guess that one of the main reasons is I want to help people. I don’t want people to go through the same thing that my mum went through, I guess, you know.

[00:15:29] Helena Holrick: And, and because it’s not actually necessary, you know, sort of, or rather that there is a, a wider, I know you well enough to know that you have a belief that the wider holistic area allows people to have a much better quality of life. So I’m going to bring us back to what you just said around quality of life.

Um, cause I know you’ve got a joyful kind of mission that’s been brewing over time.

[00:15:51] The Centenarian Olympics: A Health Mission

[00:15:51] Helena Holrick: Um, can you tell us a little bit about these Octogenarian Olympics? The Centenarian Olympics? What’s all this about, Tony?

[00:16:03] Tony Winyard: There’s, there’s a guy called Peter Attia, who I really like. I’ve got, I’ve almost got a man crush on him, I guess. And he’s a, he’s a doctor or an MD in, in America. He’s been doing a podcast for six or seven years. Um, and he’s, he’s coined a term called the centenarian decathlon. Which is all, and he’s all about healthspan and the difference between our healthspan and our lifespan is we may live to 90 But most people in those last 10 years won’t have much quality of life because they’ll just be so chronically ill They’ll be in a home probably or maybe in a hospital on Lots of different drugs can hardly move have no dignity because they can’t go to toilet on their own and so on and so so so their lifespan is 90, but their health span probably ended at 80.

So they, the last 10 years of their life, there’s no health at all.

So it’s all about, so his, what he talks about, the centenarian decathlon is if you. Um, at the age of 100, what state of health would you like to be able to be in? What would you like to still be able to do at 100, should you live to

[00:17:13] Helena Holrick: that’s a great question.

[00:17:14] Tony Winyard: to be able to, would you like to be playing with your great, great grandkids? Would you like to be able to do your own shopping, like bring your own shopping home? And reach for things from cupboards and, you know, and, so if you want to have that level of health at the age of 100. Therefore, you would need to be at this level at 90 and this level at 80 and 70 and so on. And it just made so much sense to me. And I’ve been listening to probably in the last six years, I think probably every single episode of his weekly podcast, which is, I don’t know what number he’s on now. And he released a book earlier this year called Outlive, which is just absolutely superb.

I’ve read it numerous times. And I really, I really, he’s very agnostic when it comes to like sort of diets and he doesn’t care what diet you eat. You know, he, he actually did keto for quite a few years and then eventually realized actually no, keto is not the magic pill. Same thing with intermittent fasting and various other forms of fasting.

He’s tried all of those. Much like I’ve tried all of those. And I, yeah, I came to the same conclusion. It doesn’t really matter about the diet so much, or it’s more about, well, there’s so many other factors. It’s never one thing, and it’s always a combination of many different things.

[00:18:30] Helena Holrick: And, and what’s that combination? Because it’s fascinating, you know, for, you know, I’m, I’m certainly taking on board that… Huh, as a woman in my mid 50s, I can actively, what I do now, what I’m hearing from you is, what I do now is going to impact the quality of life that I have for years to come. That’s essentially what you’re saying, right?

[00:18:55] Tony Winyard: Mm hmm, absolutely.

[00:18:56] Helena Holrick: then, and then in terms of the combination of those factors, what are some of the factors that I should or could be absolutely focused on that I might not think of as something that would be impacting?

[00:19:10] Tony Winyard: Well, there’s five main things that I put it down to.

[00:19:14] The Importance of Breathing in Health

[00:19:14] Tony Winyard: So it’s nutrition, sleep, stress, movement, and breathing. And then, and then there’s various offshoots of all of those.

[00:19:24] Helena Holrick: Right.

[00:19:25] Tony Winyard: Breathing is a really interesting one because it’s a lot of people when it comes to nutrition, they know a lot more than they realize, even if they’re not doing what they know. So they know they should be eating this or shouldn’t be eating that, but they’re not able to stop themselves. But they still know, even if they’re not actually

doing it. And in many ways, you know, we all know we probably should be sleeping seven, eight hours, even if we’re only sleeping six or whatever the case may be. Everyone knows they should be exercising more, even if they’re not. And I think everyone realizes, you know, it’s not good to be too, have too much stress. But the breathing one is the really fascinating one because hardly anyone knows that they’re breathing wrong. And it’s something like the figures. It’s something like 80% of the UK are dysfunctional breathers.

80% of people are breathing dysfunctionally. And what does breathing

[00:20:17] Helena Holrick: dysfunctionally mean?

Yeah. So tell us so that people are like, and if you’re driving in a car, listening to this, don’t do too many of the things, but listen to Tony. Like, tell us what that means.

[00:20:29] Understanding Dysfunctional Breathing

[00:20:29] Tony Winyard: So breathing dysfunctionally means you are, you are breathing in a way that’s actually detrimental to your health. And usually that means we’re breathing too fast, we’re breathing too shallow, um, and we’re, and so there’s, there’s lots of consequences from that. Um, that generally means we’re not really oxygenated, oxygenating our blood properly because we’re breathing so shallow. Um, we’re not getting a good gas exchange between CO2 and oxygen. And I don’t want to get too, too deep into the science, but, and also, and the worst thing is most people are breathing through their mouth rather than through their nose, which causes all sorts of other issues. Um, and so the more you go into the world of breathwork, and I’ve only just touched the surface of some of the things I said there, because I don’t want to start getting really nerdy about all of this sort of stuff. But the more you learn about breathwork, there’s so much to it. Like, for example, nitric oxide. Which is, uh, our nasal passages are around here. And for those of you listening, I’m just sort of pointing to the area around to the left and right of my nose. And when we breathe through our nose, we activate this gas nitro, or this molecule rather, nitric oxide. And, and it’s only activated when we breathe in through our nose, not if we breathe in through our mouth. And nitric oxide is so important, it dilates the airways. It helps with the autoimmune system. It fights viruses and pathogens and bacteria and so on. It does so many other things in the body. It helps the whole process with carbon dioxide and oxygen. It’s just like an amazing, it actually, Won the peop. There’s three guys won, uh, the Nobel Prize because of the discovery of, of nitric oxide. I, I think it was like 15 years ago or something. It’s like an amazing molecule. And as I said, you only get this by breathing in, by na nasal breathing rather than mouth breathing. And, and as I said, I’ve just touched the tip of the iceberg. When you go into breathing, there’s so much more to it and it can really. Improve your health in so many ways just by focusing on your breathing.

[00:22:36] The Role of Breathing in Stress Management

[00:22:36] Tony Winyard: And, and one simple thing, for example, is we, many people spend most of their time in a para, uh, in a sympathetic, uh, in a sympathetic nervous system, which means we’re the, the, the fight or flight, uh, situation.

So we are breathing quite sort of, um, too fast. And we’re not completely relaxed. We’re, we’re always maybe a little bit sort of stressed. And, and then that closes down many organs in the body. We don’t digest food properly when we’re in that state. Um, there’s, there’s many other things happen when we’re in that state. And so there’s, when it comes to your breathing, if you’re, when you’re breathing sort of short and shallow, that tends to put you in a, in a sympathetic state. And sympathetic sounds like a really nice word, but when it comes to the sympathetic nervous system, you don’t want to be in a sympathetic nervous system all the time. That’s what’s known as being upregulated. If you can breathe so your exhale is longer than your inhale, that will put you into the parasympathetic and parasympathetic is the opposite. So parasympathetic is when you’re completely relaxed and you’re nice and refreshed. You just feel really calm. However, and it sounds like, well, that’s the place where you want to be all the time. Well, not really. And so in between those. So you’ve got sympathetic, you’ve got parasympathetic, and in between those, it’s sort of known as coherent or it’s also known as resonant, like resonant breathing or coherent breathing.

In heart math, they call it, uh, coherent breathing. And that’s when you do that sort of box breathing technique, you know, when you, like four, you inhale for the count of four, pause for the count of four, exhale for the count of four, pause again for four, and you just keep doing that. And that state means you’re much more focused, you’re much more cognitively sharp, you’re, that’s, that’s a better state for when you’re working and you need to be like on the ball, you know, so you don’t always want to be in that parasympathetic state because then you’re too chilled. So when you’re, when you’ve got work to do, you don’t want to be too chilled. So you could say, if you want to make it really simplified, when you do short, sharp breaths, um, and where the inhale is longer than the exhale, that puts you in sympathetic. When you do, when the exhale is much longer than the inhale, that puts you in the parasympathetic. When they’re both the same, that sort of puts you in the middle.

[00:25:10] Helena Holrick: Good to know. How many people listening might well be counting their breath at this moment? Um, I suspect that that’s probably true and thank you for sharing. Um, uh, you, you said in there, I, I, I love that you’ve just shared this because this is almost like a little bit of a secret. snippet because you’re of what’s coming, isn’t it?

Like, because you’ve gotten very nerdy through all the books. I don’t even know how many books you’ve read over time, but you’ve gotten very nerdy and specifically around habits and health and, um, and all things, uh, helpful to us reaching this centenarian decathlon, right? So tell us about what’s coming for this podcast because you’re going to switch the tables a little bit, aren’t you?

So

starting

[00:26:00] The Future of the Podcast: 360 Degrees of Health Span

[00:26:00] Tony Winyard: week is, so this is series four, you know, The Art of Living Proactively. Starting next week is then series five, episode, well, it’ll be episode 251, but it’ll be episode one of series five. And that’s, that’s called, 360 degrees of health span. And I forgot what the tagline is, but essentially it’s going to be a very different format. I’m not doing guest interviews anymore. So this is the last guest interview as such. So it’s going to be much shorter episodes. So I’m only going to be about 10 minutes, but I’m going to drill down into a particular topic, so it, it could be protein. It could be sort of about humming or it could be, you know, I’ve already, I’ve already penciled out 323 different topics that I’m going to be covering.

[00:26:45] Podcast Frequency and Format

[00:26:45] Helena Holrick: is going to be daily, Tony.

[00:26:48] Tony Winyard: Well, it’s going to start off weekly. So at the moment, every episode is released at 12 o’clock on a Saturday afternoon, UK time. It’s going to start off weekly. Once I’ve got my processes down to sort of down to a T, I’m going to probably start doing two or three a week. And then I’m looking to probably do between Monday and Friday one a day, every day, Monday to Friday, probably by, I guess, March.

[00:27:17] Content Strategy: Blogs and E-books

[00:27:17] Tony Winyard: Because I also plan to for each episode… There will be an accompanying blog post and the blog post won’t have the same content as the podcast episode. But there’ll also be an e book on each episode as well about that particular topic. So there’s going to be a whole collection of different e books, which are not going to be too long. They’re going to give you enough information about that topic and notes and it will also each episode I’ll give you three habits you can use to implement the information in the episode.

[00:27:46] Storytelling and Humor in Podcasts

[00:27:46] Tony Winyard: It’s going to be very story based. I’m going to bring in a lot of stories from from my life but I’m also going to bring in stories from like from some of the famous philosophers and and from films and tv and all sorts of stuff. I’m going to definitely going to make it Story led, but there’s going to be quite a bit of humor in there as well.

[00:28:05] Helena Holrick: Oh, how wonderful.

[00:28:07] Tony Winyard: a different style.

[00:28:08] The Importance of Health Education

[00:28:08] Helena Holrick: You know, it’s really wonderful because I really hear your dedication to educating people around the fact that they can be in charge of their own health span, in charge of their own health, in charge of their own, uh, wellness and beingness in the world. And, and, and I hear that this is a perfect marriage for you around all the films, all the podcasts.

All the books that you’ve ever read. So, so, um, you mentioned stories, uh, and I know you to be a master storyteller.

[00:28:41] Sharing Personal Stories

[00:28:41] Helena Holrick: I know you from the podcast to be a master listener to other people’s stories, but wanna share a story from your life that might just help us get you, get to know you even better. Mm-Hmm.

[00:28:55] Tony Winyard: There’s so many, I mean, I lived in the Far East for 10 years. Um, I worked around Europe for a few years. I worked around the Middle East. I mean, I have so many stories, like trying to pick one is, oh wow, which one do I start with?

[00:29:09] A Life-Changing Cycling Adventure

[00:29:09] Tony Winyard: Um, a story that comes to mind, the first one that comes to mind, and I don’t know why, I, I did, in the early 2000s, I did quite a few bike rides across, across different countries, raising money for guide dogs, because I, I mentioned earlier that my mum lost her eyesight, she went blind, she got a guide dog. I started finding out the guide dogs didn’t receive any money from, from the government. And so they just had to raise all their own money to train these, you know, these guide dogs, which give blind people so much independence. And, and I was on a trip, uh, cycling across New Zealand, the South, South Island of New Zealand. And I don’t know why this story came into my head, but anyway, so there was this, this guy called Murray, this Scottish guy, he was 18. He lost his eyesight when he was 14. He was. built, he was really big, massive guy, probably twice my size. He was, you know, like a rugby player, he was built, and his attitude was incredible.

You’d think he’d be bitter at being completely blind, you know, just within four years. At the age of 14. But he wasn’t at all. He had such an amazing attitude to life. He was so curious about things. He was always smiling and happy. And he just had a great attitude to life. Anyway, he’d done the trip the year before. This is my first trip on, you know, and we’re cycling from Queenstown, uh, Christchurch to Queenstown. On the third day, so he was riding on the back of a tandem, obviously he can’t ride a bike on his own, but well, and actually that’s not completely true, but he did, but That’s

[00:30:46] Helena Holrick: That’s a different story.

[00:30:48] Tony Winyard: The third day, we’re in the, having breakfast and he said, Tony, would you go in the front of my tandem today? I said, yeah, okay. I, and I just figured he just wanted to have a chat with me and get to know me. Cause obviously when you’re riding along, you can be chatting about all sorts of things. And I’d never ridden a tandem before. And the tandem is so different to a normal bike, especially when you’ve got a guy on the back who’s twice your weight.

Yeah. And when you’re trying to turn, oh, it’s really, it’s really difficult. Anyway. So for the first few hours I was getting used to it. And then at lunch time he said, did you, uh, did you wonder why I asked you to be on the, yeah. To be riding with me today. And I said, well, I just figured you just want to have a chat.

He said, well, yeah, that, that was part of it, but there was another reason. I said, okay, yeah, go on. What’s that? He said, well, I know that you’re the fastest rider here and this afternoon, we’re coming up to, I forget the name of the hill. There was some like crazy hill that we were coming up to. And he said, and last year when we went down this hill, we managed to get to 85 kilometers an hour. I wanna beat that. And I think that you are gonna be able to help me beat that 85 kilometers an hour on a

bike.

[00:32:00] Helena Holrick: lot.

[00:32:02] Tony Winyard: So it, and this, the hill was like this. And again, for those of you listening who can’t see the video, it was really steep, this hill, and the, the Tandem had a speedometer on it, so anyway so we started and, but the bottom of the hill was a T junction. So we started going down this hill and we’ve got to like 70, 75. 80. We’ve got to 85 and I can see the bottom approaching really quickly. And if it was just me, I would have probably gone a little bit quicker, but I’ve got this blind guy in the back, I can’t wipe out. So I had to start putting on the brakes.

And so we got, we matched 85, but we didn’t get to 86, which is what he was hoping for. But he was fine about it, but it was just, wow, that was hairy. I’ve never, yeah, to be 85 on a bike was kind of crazy.

[00:32:54] Helena Holrick: And isn’t that, I mean, in, in, in many ways, I mean, thank you for sharing. In many ways, that’s, that’s sort of a metaphor for life, isn’t it? Like, it’s, it’s like if we really let ourselves, whatever the obstacles or perceived obstacles that we might actually have, if we let ourselves, we could really go for it in all sorts of ways.

Whether that is in our health, in our reading, in our connections, in, in all of the different areas of our lives. We need to make a choice, don’t we? And, and I love the choice that you had. Like I could push it or I could just begin to slow down. And that is the choice that we have so much of the time, right?

[00:33:36] Tony Winyard: Absolutely. Yeah, if he hadn’t have been on the back, I would have definitely have gone faster.

But there’s no way I could have wiped him out.

[00:33:43] Helena Holrick: Yeah. Well, how, how wonderful.

[00:33:45] Lessons from Living in Different Countries

[00:33:45] Helena Holrick: And, uh, you know, I, I know that as you’ve just sort of hinted at, you’ve lived in a lot of countries, right?

[00:33:52] Tony Winyard: Yeah, 14.

[00:33:55] Helena Holrick: That’s quite a lot of cultural input. Because they’ve all been quite diverse as well. It’s not like you’ve just hopped around Europe, is it?

[00:34:04] Tony Winyard: Now I’ve had really extremes. I mean, from very rich countries like Japan and Switzerland, to, well, Japan was very rich at the time I was there anyway, to very poor countries like Indonesia and Syria. And so, I mean, they were complete opposites, you know, and then many countries in

[00:34:21] Helena Holrick: between.

Yeah. And what’s the one thing that you’ve seen that sort of unites people?

[00:34:28] The Power of People and Connections

[00:34:28] Tony Winyard: I, I think it doesn’t matter what country you go to, it’s the, it’s the people you’re with. Um, it’s the people you meet. Every country in some ways is the same. Every country has people that are great and really friendly and really hospitable and so on. And, I mean, like for example, when I was in Syria in the late 70s, late 80s rather, and At the time, Britain closed our embassy with Syria because of the Lockerbie, um, the shoe bomb and so on. And Britain had accused a Syrian guy of doing it. I can’t remember the whole story, but anyway, we didn’t have an embassy there. And the Daily Mail, as is their want, were daily painting Syrians as being really horrible people, and it was a horrible country, and it was full of terrorists and so on. They could not have been further from the truth because my experience there, they were so warm and friendly and people always invited me into their homes for, you know, to, and wouldn’t let me spend a penny.

I was playing for a football team there of the hotel I was working for. I was working for the most luxurious hotel in the whole of Syria. It was Sheraton Damascus at the time. And I played football for the hotel football team. Which was made up of the bellboys and cooks and, you know, and I was, it’s not an exaggeration to say I was probably earning more than all of them put together, probably three times more than all of them put together. And every time we would go to play football, it’s like, it’s really hot there. And, you know, it was sometimes it was, it’d be 45 degrees in, you know, um, fahrenheit or centigrade?

, I got mixed up, but it’s very hot anyway. And they’d bring loads of water and picnic and, yeah, it was like, it was like a feast every game. And after a couple of games, I said, look, you know, can I contribute towards it? And I remember one of the guys said, no, no, Tony, you’re our guest. And I said, yeah, yeah, okay, but I would still like to contribute. And then he started getting a little bit sterner. No, Tony, you’re our guest. I made one more effort and then he got really angry.

No, you are our guest. You do not pay. And it was just, you know, they were, they knew I was earning a lot more than them, but they’re, you know, they had the way they’re painted

by our press. It’s just so untrue. And, and every country I went to, I found, I think people everywhere are really friendly.

[00:36:45] Helena Holrick: yeah.

It’s, it’s… It’s amazing what you, you know, sort of opening and expanding your eyes to culture, to ideas, to just things that you can do or the ways that you can experience life is, is absolutely amazing. And I, I think that’s what you are about to sort of do with this next series, isn’t it, really? It’s, it’s, um, you’re about to get a little bit nerdy.

I think you’re about to share some stories.

[00:37:13] Tony Winyard: Yeah.

[00:37:14] The Influence of Eastern Medicine

[00:37:14] Tony Winyard: And also I just realized that my Being in the Far East for so long, because I was in the Far East for 10 years, and the way they, their approach to medicine and to health is very different to how we approach it in the West. And I didn’t realize how much it had affected me that, seeing that firsthand. And it’s only recently I realized, oh yeah, there’s a lot of those things that I was doing when I was there has affected my kind of approach and how I see I like, in many ways, their approach to health far more than our approach to health over here.

[00:37:50] Helena Holrick: Yeah, and I think, I think that may well be responsible for the fact that, uh, you mentioned birthdays and you mentioned that, you know, this is airing literally the day before your… Wanna tell people how old you are?

[00:38:05] Tony Winyard: The day this comes out, I’m going to be 60 tomorrow.

[00:38:09] The Impact of Age and Attitude

[00:38:09] Tony Winyard: And that always seems to amaze people when I meet them and say, Oh, people seem to think that I’m in my mid forties or even younger. Some people have got very bad eyesight. But, um, yeah, so I’m, I, I mean, I do, I play a lot of sport. I’m still faster than many guys, 20, 30 years younger than me when I’m playing football.

And I. A few, few months ago I discovered weightlifting for the first time and you, I don’t, I’m not really into wearing tight clothes but I’m, for the first time in my life, I’m really ripped. I’ve never ripped before. It’s crazy. And so, um, yeah, I seem to be, and it’s all about, it’s all in the mind anyway, age, isn’t it? And I’ve never had, because I’ve been a DJ most of my life, and I’ve been crazy about music, I obviously, I’m still friends with many people that I went to school with, like far more than most people. I, there’s probably about 30 or 40 people from my school, from my school year, who we meet up regularly. We meet, I meet up with many of them next week. But there’s many people who are the same age as me. Who think in a way that’s much older.

And they, they, uh, they have so many aches and pains and they’ve, they’ve almost accepted that, Oh, I’m in my sixties now. Um, that means I’m an old person and I don’t think like that at all. And I, I, um, and I don’t have any aches or pains.

And I think that’s a lot because I do just, I guess, so much sport and movement and yoga and Pilates and

[00:39:44] Helena Holrick: and you sleep well and I

think you are one of the walking, talking role models that I know of, you know, when you see someone who is so passionate about what they do and who’s thrown so so much attention into learning their craft, you know, the, the, the, the, the health and the habits and the way in which you hold them, you’re a walking, talking billboard for doing the things that you are saying that, that you’ve not only picked up on your travels, but that you’ve then kind of extensively trained on.

And I think there’s a lot to be said for just listening to someone. So I’m going to go back to you getting really nerdy and deep diving into the the tiniest things that that make a difference because it is like the little things that make a difference make a massive difference or have the potential to make a massive difference and again if we’re back to that scenario and I think a lot of people are I’ve certainly had to do this you know look after parents in their older age and just watching that happen you know which is which can be heartbreaking for some, you know, if we can, if you can actively start that revolution of It doesn’t have to be like that.

I know that’s really close to your heart. Is, is that fair to say? Is that kind of putting you up on a thing or just setting you a good challenge?

[00:41:07] Tony Winyard: yeah, I mean, well, I’ve got a one of the challenges that I’ve sort of set myself or and a tagline I’m gonna be using is I want to help a hundred people reach to be centenarians. Yeah So yeah, I do want to help people. It’s not actually about people getting to a hundred. That’s just a number It’s more about helping people be healthy for as long as possible So I mean like, you know, so that they’re only In a, maybe an unhealthy state for the last few weeks or months of their life, rather than as many people now, it’s like a decade or even more for most people in, in chronic disease and just having no dignity or freedom, you know, independence or whatever.

So yeah, so I want to help people with that. Um, and I, there was something I was just about to say and I can’t remember what it was, but

[00:42:01] Helena Holrick: Take your time. It’s all good because life is there to be enjoyed.

[00:42:07] Tony Winyard: Yeah, absolutely.

I go and watch quite a lot of comedy. I’m very much into stand up comedy, though. And I’ve performed quite a bit of stand up comedy, but I prefer to watch stand up comedy. But

[00:42:18] Helena Holrick: Well, so, so it sounds like, you know, sort of in the upcoming episodes, not only will there be a bunch of education, you deep diving and getting slightly nerdy around the things that you’ve got, probably sharing. One or three stories. And

[00:42:34] Tony Winyard: humorous way. Because I think that’s the difference.

[00:42:36] Helena Holrick: a

[00:42:37] Tony Winyard: some of these… Topics I’m very aware can be very dry. So I want to try and make them much more appealing to people and have, and try and integrate or bring a little bit of humor into each episode if I can.

[00:42:52] Helena Holrick: I could talk to you for a long, long while and I suspect that all I’m going to do instead is actually listen to what’s coming up. For those of you who are slightly newer to this, I would highly recommend, you know, the The tiny tips. So, so Tony has definitely helped me on a health level, uh, just live my life that little bit better.

Oddly enough, or not, through the breathing more than anything. So, um, I think there are lots of little things we can all do to set us on the road to that health span that you are talking about.

[00:43:30] Tony Winyard: I’ve remembered what it was I was going to

[00:43:32] Helena Holrick: I could see that.

[00:43:34] Tony Winyard: so, one of the things that I found very interesting in the last few years as I’ve done all these different courses. And for example, when I was doing the breathing course, um, And, and I know lots of breathwork instructors and, and there’s a particular group I’m on, uh, sort of, uh, an internet group for all these different breathing instructors. And no matter what problem someone has, breathing is the answer. And then I’m on this nutrition group for all these nutrition coaches. It doesn’t matter what problem someone has, nutrition is the answer. Same thing for sleep. Um, and what I’ve realized is, you know, it’s that man with a hammer, you know, everything’s in it.

for a man with a hammer, everything is a nail, or if it’s something like that.

[00:44:16] Helena Holrick: that’s the

[00:44:16] Tony Winyard: And in all of these different, it doesn’t matter what it is you learn, you think whatever it is that you’ve learned, that is the answer to everything when it comes to health anyway. But what I’ve realized is no, it’s not, it’s never any one thing.

It’s always, it’s many things. You can’t just address the one thing. It’s, it’s. You have to, you have to look at all these different things. You have to look at not just your nutrition, but your sleep, and your stress, and your movement, and your breathing, and so on.

[00:44:47] Helena Holrick: It’s wonderful.

So, Yeah, isn’t it just? And how, how wonderful that we get to live it and live it well, right?

Um, so I’m gonna turn the tables on you for one last time before you sort of begin to do this again. So I believe you always finish with a book that’s moved you. So with all the hundreds and thousands of books that you’ve read, what’s a book that’s moved you, Tony?

[00:45:14] Tony Winyard: This is crazy that I’m going to struggle to answer this when I ask people this every week.

[00:45:19] Helena Holrick: Now you know how they feel!

[00:45:19] The Importance of Sleep

[00:45:19] Tony Winyard: guess, I’ve read, I’ve literally read hundreds of books in the last few years, but I guess the one that stands out, and so it must be this is Matthew Walker, um, Why We Sleep. And, and I guess the reason why I’m saying this is because it’s the, the first book, or is the book that, as I read it more, and I read it a few times, and I realized just how important sleep is to our overall health.

I mean, I just went and said that it’s not one thing, it’s a combination of things. Sleep, I think, is the most important. And I remember I actually said to them, and I wrote it down, I am now making sleep my number one priority. And that was in 2020. I remember that. And since then I have, and even though I’m still DJing sometimes, and so sometimes I’m not getting home till very late, but I’m still, Um, sleep is my number one priority.

I mean, well, my daughter Bonnie is my number one priority, but as far as health is concerned, sleep is my number one priority. And I think because I make that such a priority, it’s one of the reasons why I am so healthy and I, I, I’m never ill. I don’t really, and I seemed, I’m, I’m usually, I don’t ever get depressed or in a bad mood, and I think sleep has got something to do with that. Um, you know, I’m charging my brain well.

[00:46:44] Helena Holrick: Yeah, I’m looking forward to the episode in which you talk about that is all I can say. So we’ve heard about the book. What about a quote that really resonates for you?

[00:46:57] The Power of Quotes

[00:46:57] Tony Winyard: Well, interestingly enough, and there’s a few people who have said this quote, who have been guests on this show. And it’s a quote that says there’s a space between stimulus and response, and in that space is our room for growth and freedom. And it’s always attributed to, uh, Viktor Frankl, but actually it wasn’t Viktor Frankl that said it. And it’s not clear who actually said it. And when, there’s, there’s a great website and I’ll put this in the show notes, there’s a great website called Quote Investigator, who goes really nerdy on these. There’s so many Einstein, there’s so many quotes attributed to Einstein, for example, which Einstein never said any of them.

[00:47:39] Helena Holrick: You mean he wasn’t as clever as we think he is?

[00:47:41] Tony Winyard: yeah, so this is one of those, those quotes. It’s always attributed to Viktor Frankl. But in Man’s Search for Meaning, he had an amazing book. He did say some things which are very similar to that, but he didn’t actually say those words. And in, uh, Stephen Covey’s book, Seven, uh, Habits of Highly Successful People, that’s where it seems to be first attributed to Viktor Frankl, because he says in that book, uh, Viktor Frankl said, but, and so when you look at this, um, article by Quote Investigator, he goes very deep into, who was it who actually said this?

And so anyway, it doesn’t, in some ways it doesn’t matter who said it, because it’s a fantastic quote.

[00:48:23] Helena Holrick: Yeah.

[00:48:24] Tony Winyard: since first reading that quote, I don’t know how many years ago it was, I think about it, I wouldn’t say daily, that’s not true, but I do think about it regularly and I am now.

[00:48:36] The Space Between Stimulus and Response

[00:48:36] Tony Winyard: I’ve worked on myself to make that pause much longer so I don’t have the default reaction I used to have. Because I used to do what most people do, you know, you’re driving and someone cuts you up and you start swearing at them as if they can hear you, you know. And all these things that you just do on a default, I don’t do on a default anymore. I now give myself time to think. and I’ll react differently.

[00:49:00] Helena Holrick: And do you have a tip? I’m sure there are a lot of people listening that are sort of going, how do you do that? What’s your tip for, for increasing the space between stimulus and response?

[00:49:13] Breathwork as a Tool for Response

[00:49:13] Tony Winyard: Well, it comes down to breathwork really, because the more you can be downregulated and more in that sort of parasympathetic state and more like more relaxed, you’re able to think more coherently. And that allows you to, that thing, how the stimulus happens and where you would normally just respond, actually. No. Was it, is, was that as bad as I, you know, do I need to be offended by that? Do I need to be angry about that? Do I, you actually give yourself time to think about your reaction rather than just having a reaction. And it’s not easy. It does take time.

[00:49:54] Developing Healthy Habits

[00:49:54] Tony Winyard: But if you, if you think about this a lot, and, but this is how it’s been for me anyway, I thought about this a lot for the last probably seven, eight years. And, and I, my. I do have a much bigger gap now between the stimulus and the response.

[00:50:10] Helena Holrick: So you’ve developed that habit beautifully.

[00:50:12] Tony Winyard: Yeah, I guess so. Yeah.

Yeah,

[00:50:14] Helena Holrick: how wonderful. Well, as I say, you’re a walking, talking example of all that you talk about. And I am definitely looking forward to hearing much more.

[00:50:25] Closing Remarks and Gratitude

[00:50:25] Helena Holrick: So I wish you all the best with the new series. Long may it continue.

[00:50:31] Tony Winyard: Well, and thank you, Helena, for all that you’ve done for me. And you’ve done so much for me over the last, was it five years, I think, since we first

met. And yeah, you were a guest four years ago. So I really want to give a big thank you to you because you’ve been a massive help. So thank you.

[00:50:47] Helena Holrick: you are so welcome,

[00:50:49] Tony Winyard: Thank you, Helena.

Well listeners, we’ve reached the final episode of The Art of Living Proactively I can’t quite believe this marvelous journey is drawing to an end, after 250 thought provoking installments. But don’t despair. I return next week, with an exhilarating new vision. Welcome 360 degrees of health span, where I provide practical pearls to optimize your longevity.

We’ll be exploring every angle of whole person health, not just the physical, but also mental, emotional, social, and spiritual. I’m overflowing with fervour to share this fresh focus with you all culminates years of researching lifestyle medicine, and seeing firsthand how small, consistent actions reap massive rewards. So do join me on this quest to help you sculpt sustainable habits across all facets of life. Let’s revel together in the adventure of becoming our best selves.

I sincerely believe these bite-sized episodes will prove invaluable. They’ll be around about 10 minutes, each something along those lines. Please do subscribe on your favorite podcast platform. Leave sparkling reviews. Share posts with friends and comment on our YouTube channel. Your support means the world to me. So one last time, I thank you profoundly for making this such a special community to nurture. Here’s to many more mutually meaningful moments on the road ahead.

Hope you have a great weekend.

Favourite Quote

"Between stimulus and response there is a space. In that space is our power to choose our response. In our response lies our growth and our freedom."

Tony Winyard – 250

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Greetings. This is your host, Tony Winyard welcoming you to a very special 250th episode of The Art of Living Proactively podcast. Today I hathee a delightful privilege of being the interviewee, rather than the interviewer, with the talented Helena Holrick taking the reigns. She will be gently grilling me about the Genesis of this podcast, my approach to interviewing and the habits I’m cultivating. I’ll also reveal an exciting rebrand happening in episode 251 next week.

So strap in for an enthralling ride into the future of this podcast. There may even be some surprising stories from my globe- trotting past sprinkled into give a glimpse into what shaped my perspectives. So hope you enjoy this celebratory episode. It promises to be a riveting and rewarding one. When it finishes

I would love for you to leave comments on the YouTube channel about what most intrigued or inspired you. And now without further delay, let’s hand. The mic over to Halena and dive right in.

[00:01:09] Introduction and Episode Overview

[00:01:11] Tony Winyard: Welcome to The Art of Living Proactively, and today is a very different episode. It’s episode 250, for one thing. I’m not actually the guest on this episode, where usually I’m the host. Oh, sorry, I’m not actually the host on this episode, rather, where usually I am. I’m the guest today.

[00:01:29] Helena Holrick: Yay!

[00:01:29] Introducing the Guest Host: Helena Holrick

[00:01:29] Tony Winyard: And the host is, well, let me introduce you to Helena Holrick. And any of you who’ve been listening to my podcast for quite a few years, or if you’ve been listening since the beginning, I don’t know how many people there still are. But Helena was a guest about four years ago, and in probably around episode 30 ish or something along those

lines. So, um, hello Helena.

[00:01:53] Helena Holrick: Hello! It’s so nice to be here and it’s so fantastic to be able to turn the tables. And just facilitate everyone listening. You know, for those of you who are long term fans of Tony, welcome. And you’re gonna find out some, some things about Tony that you may never have known. And yet he may well have, introduced you to.

For those of you who are fairly new to Tony, hello and welcome to you as well.

[00:02:21] The Journey of the Podcast

[00:02:21] Helena Holrick: You’re about to find out something about, the, the direction that this podcast is actually taking because, Tony, you’ve been doing podcasts now for how long?

[00:02:33] Tony Winyard: It’s coming up to six years I guess, it’s over five years anyway,

[00:02:37] Helena Holrick: Yeah,

for sure. And, this episode, which starts the whole new thing, which we’ll talk about in a minute, this episode is going to be the 250th episode, which is really quite some going. Your passion and dedication to finding and then sharing with your audience, some really diverse characters is, it kind of knows no bounds.

So tell us a little bit about what inspires you to reach out to someone to put them on the show, whichever iteration of the show we’ve been going through.

[00:03:14] Tony Winyard: It’s just the whole scratch my own itch thing, you know, I just, I’m I’m so incredibly curious about so many different things. And I’ll be reading something. I mean, I just read loads and loads of books and often it will be, I’ll be reading a book and I think, ah, I should have an episode about that. And then I’ll either reach out to the author of that book, which I’ve done many times and I’ve had many authors on, or I’ll reach out to an author of another book, maybe on the same topic, or, you know, I’ve done that many a time.

[00:03:47] The Art of Interviewing

[00:03:47] Helena Holrick: And you have a particular style around how you interview people. Can you say more? Because I, I know for a fact from listening, and I know that others tell you this as well, that they just, you seem to extract quite a lot out of your guests. That just allows them to share possibly more than they anticipated.

And most of them, I know this because you and I have been in conversation, turn around and say, That was a really good interview. What, what’s your knack.

[00:04:20] Tony’s Radio Career and Interviewing Celebrities

[00:04:20] Tony Winyard: Well, so I did radio for eight years in the 90s. And I was working on a big station in Jakarta, Indonesia, which was their equivalent, of Capital radio. So it was a very big station. And there was a lot of major stars used to go and do, shows in Jakarta and like making appearances to sell their books and films.

And when I say major stars, I mean A list celebrities. And because I was the only native English speaking person on this radio station. They asked me to do these interviews. So I was interviewing people along the lines of Cindy Crawford and Steven Segal and Bon Jovi and Take That and George Benson. I mean, like some huge, huge

names, loads and loads of them.

[00:05:06] The Evolution of Tony’s Interviewing Style

[00:05:06] Tony Winyard: And initially in the early days of doing these interviews, I would do loads of research on every person and I’d come to the interview with this whole list of questions. And it, it soon, I soon realized no one actually said anything to me because they gave me complete control. The radio station were really cool with me, but I realized there wasn’t, the interviews weren’t really flowing.

It was just me asking lots of questions and it was just kind of a bit stuttery almost.

[00:05:33] The Impact of Confidence in Interviewing

[00:05:33] Tony Winyard: And then one day I was just, I don’t know, I was just sort of, I just guess confident with myself. I had enough confidence in myself. I’m not going to do any into, I’m not going to do any research for this episode. I’m just going to have a conversation and see where it goes. It was amazing. The difference was incredible. I remember that very first interview. It was a guy, any jazz aficionados may know of a guy called Bob James, who was really big in the jazz fusion world in the 70s and 80s. And I was interviewing this guy. And I really like Bob James, as it goes. And we went down all sorts of paths and, and I remember him saying to me at one point, wow, you, and actually what you just said is it basically what he said. We’ve, we’ve covered some stuff here. I haven’t, cause all he was doing all day long and many of the people I was speaking to were just doing interviews all day long with different radio stations, TV stations, newspapers, and so on. We’ve been talking about some stuff that I haven’t spoken about in any other interviews.

[00:06:35] The Importance of Curiosity in Conversations

[00:06:35] Tony Winyard: It’s, I’ve really enjoyed it and and I have had many people say that and it, I don’t, I just have a conversation with people. I don’t know where it’s going to go. I, a lot of what I ask depends on what they say.

[00:06:48] Helena Holrick: It makes complete and utter sense. And it’s great that you’ve just said that because, because, you know, well, two things pop for me and I’m like, who was your favorite?

[00:06:59] Tony’s Favorite Interview Experiences

[00:06:59] Helena Holrick: If you got free and easy with the conversations, who was your favorite? Or what was your best kind of like. question that then opens someone up in a way that you never thought it would.

[00:07:12] Tony Winyard: Oh wow, that’s a really hard question. So many. Um, who’s my favorite? I guess, oh actually no, I can answer this. My favorite. Was a guy called Bluey Maunick, who is the lead singer of Incognito.

[00:07:28] Helena Holrick: Uh huh.

[00:07:29] Tony Winyard: And he was a guest on my show when I was in Jakarta. And it’s definitely favoritism because I love his music. I love Incognito. And we also had a lot of fun, um, kind of ribbing each other because he’s a Tottenham supporter and I’m an Arsenal supporter. So we were giving each other lots of, like, ribbing as well. And it was just a real fun interview. So yeah, I really enjoyed that. So

[00:07:57] Helena Holrick: Oh, good for you. And it’s interesting because you also mentioned kind of what gives you confidence and there’s a point at which, um, one, a person gains confidence in something after having done it for a little while or having built kind of a habit around it.

[00:08:16] Tony’s Work Outside Podcasting

[00:08:16] Helena Holrick: Can you tell us a little bit about how you help?

people get confidence because I think a lot of people know you as a podcast host, but they might not know what you do outside of it. So, so expand everyone’s world a little bit around what you do and why habits are important to you and how that leads to confidence.

[00:08:38] The Importance of Habits in Achieving Goals

[00:08:38] Tony Winyard: yeah, I realized, um, we all… Every person listening to this has so many things that they want to do, but they’re not doing. And I don’t think there’s a person on earth who that doesn’t apply to. And, and so that’s, you know, there’s many habits that we wish that we were doing on a regular basis, but we’re not doing. And I’m as guilty of that as anyone, probably more so. And I was in many books. I was, well, a few years ago, I got really into deep into, I was just reading so many books around different aspects of health and nutrition and sleep and stress and so on. And as I was putting all this together and I started doing various courses, I did a breathwork course and a nutrition coach course and so on, and as I was doing all these courses and I started to sort of coach people and I realized that. People were struggling to make these into habits. They weren’t actually following through on the things that we were talking about. And I was trying to understand why. And then I happened to be reading a book called Tiny Habits. And then literally I think a light bulb went off. Ah, this is the missing piece. And what was quite strange about that was… It was almost, actually thinking about it, it was almost three years ago to this day, because what happened was, I was reading the book, it was the day before my birthday, so it would have been December the 2nd, 2020. And I was reading the book and I thought, and then it mentioned in the book, we do courses to train people to be Tiny Habits coaches. So I went online and I saw there was a course starting, oh it would have been December the 1st, because the course started the following day, which was December the 2nd. So I signed up for the course, they happened to have one space left, I went on the course, started December the 2nd. And one of the first questions they asked during the course was, um, we, we want you to answer some questions. So we’re going to start off with the, the oldest person will speak first. So, oh no, sorry, not oldest, whoever’s birthday is nearest. So we all had to say our birthdates. And I said, well, I think it’s probably going to be me, because in four hours time, it’s my birthday. So, yeah, so it’s almost exactly three years ago that, that was, yeah.

[00:11:06] Helena Holrick: Wow. And, and, you know, sort of, I, I really hear in that, that, that with the breath work, with the nutrition, I know you’ve done a whole bunch of other sort of integrative trainings around health.

[00:11:20] The Role of Health in Tony’s Life

[00:11:20] Helena Holrick: Why is health so important to you? And why is it so important for you to kind of share what you know, kind of learn about it and share?

[00:11:29] Tony Winyard: I think there’s a few things.

[00:11:31] The Impact of Family Health History

[00:11:31] Tony Winyard: One is, um, my health history in my family. A lot of people have died young in my family. Um, My, um, both my brothers died in their sort of early 50s, my dad did, my mum had, well she went blind in the, in the late 90s, and then she had various sort of cancers, she had breast cancer, it went, came back, she had to have a, a mastectomy, it went, came back, had a double mastectomy, and then she had terminal cancer, and then she passed away. One of my uncles had testicular, uh, prostate cancer, sorry. My granddad died of lung cancer, my nan died of, so cancer was very prevalent in the family. Lots of people have died and then other people have died from, from various things and so I guess it, it was just always in, you know, am I gonna die young as well?

I would, at one point I was thinking, well it’s obviously, it’s just a matter of time until I get cancer

because everyone was having cancer. So that was kind of set me off reading a lot about cancer. Initially, I was reading a lot about cancer, and the more I read, then I started sort of learning about epigenetics, which, uh, which means, no, I’m not destined to get cancer.

It’s about, it’s not just about our genes, it’s about how the environment that we’re living in and the food that we’re eating and the toxins we’re exposed to and many, many other things. So yeah, so now I know I’m not destined to get cancer. But that, initially, just reading all those books on cancer, led me to reading books on many other, many other things.

[00:13:01] The Importance of Nutrition in Health

[00:13:01] Helena Holrick: And, you know, lots of us read lots of things because we get interested in it, but you’ve taken it kind of one step further and you’ve actually placed it at the heart of Not just this podcast, but also, you know, especially because you’ve been talking about proactivity for quite some time during this particular series, but you’ve really taken the whole health effort into something that matters to you personally.

Why is that?

[00:13:31] Tony Winyard: I think that was because of the way my mum was treated by, um, the doctors who were treating her. Um, as I was learning more and more about cancer and I saw how important nutrition was, and they never ever spoke to her about nutrition. All they ever did was offer her more and more chemotherapy. and aggressive chemotherapy.

And there was all sorts of side effects, you know, losing her hair, getting flu constantly, just lots of, it just so affected her quality of life. Her quality of life just went, really went downhill. And, and it was really frustrating that she wouldn’t listen to me because I kept talking to her about nutrition, but she had that, um, that, uh, white coat syndrome.

[00:14:19] Helena Holrick: Uh huh.

[00:14:20] Tony Winyard: You know, you’d only listen to someone who’s got a white coat. And I, she’s no, I had no training in medicine. So why should she listen to me? That was kind of her

approach. And it wasn’t that she was ignoring me because my mom loved me, but I, it, it, I just found it really frustrating that the doctors would never mention anything about nutrition.

So not once did they say, you know, ask her about the food that she’s and, and it was down to the food she was eating and her diet was terrible. And, and yeah, they, they never mentioned that. And I guess it just. I don’t want anyone else to go through this. Like what are, I mean, um, a medical system in many ways, the NHS is, is amazing, but not when it comes, I mean, I’ve since met so many doctors and I’ve had loads of doctors as guests on my podcast. Um, and every doctor I’ve spoken to admits the same thing. They don’t get any training in nutrition in their seven years of medical study. Um, and yeah, it’s so important.

And so I guess that one of the main reasons is I want to help people. I don’t want people to go through the same thing that my mum went through, I guess, you know.

[00:15:29] Helena Holrick: And, and because it’s not actually necessary, you know, sort of, or rather that there is a, a wider, I know you well enough to know that you have a belief that the wider holistic area allows people to have a much better quality of life. So I’m going to bring us back to what you just said around quality of life.

Um, cause I know you’ve got a joyful kind of mission that’s been brewing over time.

[00:15:51] The Centenarian Olympics: A Health Mission

[00:15:51] Helena Holrick: Um, can you tell us a little bit about these Octogenarian Olympics? The Centenarian Olympics? What’s all this about, Tony?

[00:16:03] Tony Winyard: There’s, there’s a guy called Peter Attia, who I really like. I’ve got, I’ve almost got a man crush on him, I guess. And he’s a, he’s a doctor or an MD in, in America. He’s been doing a podcast for six or seven years. Um, and he’s, he’s coined a term called the centenarian decathlon. Which is all, and he’s all about healthspan and the difference between our healthspan and our lifespan is we may live to 90 But most people in those last 10 years won’t have much quality of life because they’ll just be so chronically ill They’ll be in a home probably or maybe in a hospital on Lots of different drugs can hardly move have no dignity because they can’t go to toilet on their own and so on and so so so their lifespan is 90, but their health span probably ended at 80.

So they, the last 10 years of their life, there’s no health at all.

So it’s all about, so his, what he talks about, the centenarian decathlon is if you. Um, at the age of 100, what state of health would you like to be able to be in? What would you like to still be able to do at 100, should you live to

[00:17:13] Helena Holrick: that’s a great question.

[00:17:14] Tony Winyard: to be able to, would you like to be playing with your great, great grandkids? Would you like to be able to do your own shopping, like bring your own shopping home? And reach for things from cupboards and, you know, and, so if you want to have that level of health at the age of 100. Therefore, you would need to be at this level at 90 and this level at 80 and 70 and so on. And it just made so much sense to me. And I’ve been listening to probably in the last six years, I think probably every single episode of his weekly podcast, which is, I don’t know what number he’s on now. And he released a book earlier this year called Outlive, which is just absolutely superb.

I’ve read it numerous times. And I really, I really, he’s very agnostic when it comes to like sort of diets and he doesn’t care what diet you eat. You know, he, he actually did keto for quite a few years and then eventually realized actually no, keto is not the magic pill. Same thing with intermittent fasting and various other forms of fasting.

He’s tried all of those. Much like I’ve tried all of those. And I, yeah, I came to the same conclusion. It doesn’t really matter about the diet so much, or it’s more about, well, there’s so many other factors. It’s never one thing, and it’s always a combination of many different things.

[00:18:30] Helena Holrick: And, and what’s that combination? Because it’s fascinating, you know, for, you know, I’m, I’m certainly taking on board that… Huh, as a woman in my mid 50s, I can actively, what I do now, what I’m hearing from you is, what I do now is going to impact the quality of life that I have for years to come. That’s essentially what you’re saying, right?

[00:18:55] Tony Winyard: Mm hmm, absolutely.

[00:18:56] Helena Holrick: then, and then in terms of the combination of those factors, what are some of the factors that I should or could be absolutely focused on that I might not think of as something that would be impacting?

[00:19:10] Tony Winyard: Well, there’s five main things that I put it down to.

[00:19:14] The Importance of Breathing in Health

[00:19:14] Tony Winyard: So it’s nutrition, sleep, stress, movement, and breathing. And then, and then there’s various offshoots of all of those.

[00:19:24] Helena Holrick: Right.

[00:19:25] Tony Winyard: Breathing is a really interesting one because it’s a lot of people when it comes to nutrition, they know a lot more than they realize, even if they’re not doing what they know. So they know they should be eating this or shouldn’t be eating that, but they’re not able to stop themselves. But they still know, even if they’re not actually

doing it. And in many ways, you know, we all know we probably should be sleeping seven, eight hours, even if we’re only sleeping six or whatever the case may be. Everyone knows they should be exercising more, even if they’re not. And I think everyone realizes, you know, it’s not good to be too, have too much stress. But the breathing one is the really fascinating one because hardly anyone knows that they’re breathing wrong. And it’s something like the figures. It’s something like 80% of the UK are dysfunctional breathers.

80% of people are breathing dysfunctionally. And what does breathing

[00:20:17] Helena Holrick: dysfunctionally mean?

Yeah. So tell us so that people are like, and if you’re driving in a car, listening to this, don’t do too many of the things, but listen to Tony. Like, tell us what that means.

[00:20:29] Understanding Dysfunctional Breathing

[00:20:29] Tony Winyard: So breathing dysfunctionally means you are, you are breathing in a way that’s actually detrimental to your health. And usually that means we’re breathing too fast, we’re breathing too shallow, um, and we’re, and so there’s, there’s lots of consequences from that. Um, that generally means we’re not really oxygenated, oxygenating our blood properly because we’re breathing so shallow. Um, we’re not getting a good gas exchange between CO2 and oxygen. And I don’t want to get too, too deep into the science, but, and also, and the worst thing is most people are breathing through their mouth rather than through their nose, which causes all sorts of other issues. Um, and so the more you go into the world of breathwork, and I’ve only just touched the surface of some of the things I said there, because I don’t want to start getting really nerdy about all of this sort of stuff. But the more you learn about breathwork, there’s so much to it. Like, for example, nitric oxide. Which is, uh, our nasal passages are around here. And for those of you listening, I’m just sort of pointing to the area around to the left and right of my nose. And when we breathe through our nose, we activate this gas nitro, or this molecule rather, nitric oxide. And, and it’s only activated when we breathe in through our nose, not if we breathe in through our mouth. And nitric oxide is so important, it dilates the airways. It helps with the autoimmune system. It fights viruses and pathogens and bacteria and so on. It does so many other things in the body. It helps the whole process with carbon dioxide and oxygen. It’s just like an amazing, it actually, Won the peop. There’s three guys won, uh, the Nobel Prize because of the discovery of, of nitric oxide. I, I think it was like 15 years ago or something. It’s like an amazing molecule. And as I said, you only get this by breathing in, by na nasal breathing rather than mouth breathing. And, and as I said, I’ve just touched the tip of the iceberg. When you go into breathing, there’s so much more to it and it can really. Improve your health in so many ways just by focusing on your breathing.

[00:22:36] The Role of Breathing in Stress Management

[00:22:36] Tony Winyard: And, and one simple thing, for example, is we, many people spend most of their time in a para, uh, in a sympathetic, uh, in a sympathetic nervous system, which means we’re the, the, the fight or flight, uh, situation.

So we are breathing quite sort of, um, too fast. And we’re not completely relaxed. We’re, we’re always maybe a little bit sort of stressed. And, and then that closes down many organs in the body. We don’t digest food properly when we’re in that state. Um, there’s, there’s many other things happen when we’re in that state. And so there’s, when it comes to your breathing, if you’re, when you’re breathing sort of short and shallow, that tends to put you in a, in a sympathetic state. And sympathetic sounds like a really nice word, but when it comes to the sympathetic nervous system, you don’t want to be in a sympathetic nervous system all the time. That’s what’s known as being upregulated. If you can breathe so your exhale is longer than your inhale, that will put you into the parasympathetic and parasympathetic is the opposite. So parasympathetic is when you’re completely relaxed and you’re nice and refreshed. You just feel really calm. However, and it sounds like, well, that’s the place where you want to be all the time. Well, not really. And so in between those. So you’ve got sympathetic, you’ve got parasympathetic, and in between those, it’s sort of known as coherent or it’s also known as resonant, like resonant breathing or coherent breathing.

In heart math, they call it, uh, coherent breathing. And that’s when you do that sort of box breathing technique, you know, when you, like four, you inhale for the count of four, pause for the count of four, exhale for the count of four, pause again for four, and you just keep doing that. And that state means you’re much more focused, you’re much more cognitively sharp, you’re, that’s, that’s a better state for when you’re working and you need to be like on the ball, you know, so you don’t always want to be in that parasympathetic state because then you’re too chilled. So when you’re, when you’ve got work to do, you don’t want to be too chilled. So you could say, if you want to make it really simplified, when you do short, sharp breaths, um, and where the inhale is longer than the exhale, that puts you in sympathetic. When you do, when the exhale is much longer than the inhale, that puts you in the parasympathetic. When they’re both the same, that sort of puts you in the middle.

[00:25:10] Helena Holrick: Good to know. How many people listening might well be counting their breath at this moment? Um, I suspect that that’s probably true and thank you for sharing. Um, uh, you, you said in there, I, I, I love that you’ve just shared this because this is almost like a little bit of a secret. snippet because you’re of what’s coming, isn’t it?

Like, because you’ve gotten very nerdy through all the books. I don’t even know how many books you’ve read over time, but you’ve gotten very nerdy and specifically around habits and health and, um, and all things, uh, helpful to us reaching this centenarian decathlon, right? So tell us about what’s coming for this podcast because you’re going to switch the tables a little bit, aren’t you?

So

starting

[00:26:00] The Future of the Podcast: 360 Degrees of Health Span

[00:26:00] Tony Winyard: week is, so this is series four, you know, The Art of Living Proactively. Starting next week is then series five, episode, well, it’ll be episode 251, but it’ll be episode one of series five. And that’s, that’s called, 360 degrees of health span. And I forgot what the tagline is, but essentially it’s going to be a very different format. I’m not doing guest interviews anymore. So this is the last guest interview as such. So it’s going to be much shorter episodes. So I’m only going to be about 10 minutes, but I’m going to drill down into a particular topic, so it, it could be protein. It could be sort of about humming or it could be, you know, I’ve already, I’ve already penciled out 323 different topics that I’m going to be covering.

[00:26:45] Podcast Frequency and Format

[00:26:45] Helena Holrick: is going to be daily, Tony.

[00:26:48] Tony Winyard: Well, it’s going to start off weekly. So at the moment, every episode is released at 12 o’clock on a Saturday afternoon, UK time. It’s going to start off weekly. Once I’ve got my processes down to sort of down to a T, I’m going to probably start doing two or three a week. And then I’m looking to probably do between Monday and Friday one a day, every day, Monday to Friday, probably by, I guess, March.

[00:27:17] Content Strategy: Blogs and E-books

[00:27:17] Tony Winyard: Because I also plan to for each episode… There will be an accompanying blog post and the blog post won’t have the same content as the podcast episode. But there’ll also be an e book on each episode as well about that particular topic. So there’s going to be a whole collection of different e books, which are not going to be too long. They’re going to give you enough information about that topic and notes and it will also each episode I’ll give you three habits you can use to implement the information in the episode.

[00:27:46] Storytelling and Humor in Podcasts

[00:27:46] Tony Winyard: It’s going to be very story based. I’m going to bring in a lot of stories from from my life but I’m also going to bring in stories from like from some of the famous philosophers and and from films and tv and all sorts of stuff. I’m going to definitely going to make it Story led, but there’s going to be quite a bit of humor in there as well.

[00:28:05] Helena Holrick: Oh, how wonderful.

[00:28:07] Tony Winyard: a different style.

[00:28:08] The Importance of Health Education

[00:28:08] Helena Holrick: You know, it’s really wonderful because I really hear your dedication to educating people around the fact that they can be in charge of their own health span, in charge of their own health, in charge of their own, uh, wellness and beingness in the world. And, and, and I hear that this is a perfect marriage for you around all the films, all the podcasts.

All the books that you’ve ever read. So, so, um, you mentioned stories, uh, and I know you to be a master storyteller.

[00:28:41] Sharing Personal Stories

[00:28:41] Helena Holrick: I know you from the podcast to be a master listener to other people’s stories, but wanna share a story from your life that might just help us get you, get to know you even better. Mm-Hmm.

[00:28:55] Tony Winyard: There’s so many, I mean, I lived in the Far East for 10 years. Um, I worked around Europe for a few years. I worked around the Middle East. I mean, I have so many stories, like trying to pick one is, oh wow, which one do I start with?

[00:29:09] A Life-Changing Cycling Adventure

[00:29:09] Tony Winyard: Um, a story that comes to mind, the first one that comes to mind, and I don’t know why, I, I did, in the early 2000s, I did quite a few bike rides across, across different countries, raising money for guide dogs, because I, I mentioned earlier that my mum lost her eyesight, she went blind, she got a guide dog. I started finding out the guide dogs didn’t receive any money from, from the government. And so they just had to raise all their own money to train these, you know, these guide dogs, which give blind people so much independence. And, and I was on a trip, uh, cycling across New Zealand, the South, South Island of New Zealand. And I don’t know why this story came into my head, but anyway, so there was this, this guy called Murray, this Scottish guy, he was 18. He lost his eyesight when he was 14. He was. built, he was really big, massive guy, probably twice my size. He was, you know, like a rugby player, he was built, and his attitude was incredible.

You’d think he’d be bitter at being completely blind, you know, just within four years. At the age of 14. But he wasn’t at all. He had such an amazing attitude to life. He was so curious about things. He was always smiling and happy. And he just had a great attitude to life. Anyway, he’d done the trip the year before. This is my first trip on, you know, and we’re cycling from Queenstown, uh, Christchurch to Queenstown. On the third day, so he was riding on the back of a tandem, obviously he can’t ride a bike on his own, but well, and actually that’s not completely true, but he did, but That’s

[00:30:46] Helena Holrick: That’s a different story.

[00:30:48] Tony Winyard: The third day, we’re in the, having breakfast and he said, Tony, would you go in the front of my tandem today? I said, yeah, okay. I, and I just figured he just wanted to have a chat with me and get to know me. Cause obviously when you’re riding along, you can be chatting about all sorts of things. And I’d never ridden a tandem before. And the tandem is so different to a normal bike, especially when you’ve got a guy on the back who’s twice your weight.

Yeah. And when you’re trying to turn, oh, it’s really, it’s really difficult. Anyway. So for the first few hours I was getting used to it. And then at lunch time he said, did you, uh, did you wonder why I asked you to be on the, yeah. To be riding with me today. And I said, well, I just figured you just want to have a chat.

He said, well, yeah, that, that was part of it, but there was another reason. I said, okay, yeah, go on. What’s that? He said, well, I know that you’re the fastest rider here and this afternoon, we’re coming up to, I forget the name of the hill. There was some like crazy hill that we were coming up to. And he said, and last year when we went down this hill, we managed to get to 85 kilometers an hour. I wanna beat that. And I think that you are gonna be able to help me beat that 85 kilometers an hour on a

bike.

[00:32:00] Helena Holrick: lot.

[00:32:02] Tony Winyard: So it, and this, the hill was like this. And again, for those of you listening who can’t see the video, it was really steep, this hill, and the, the Tandem had a speedometer on it, so anyway so we started and, but the bottom of the hill was a T junction. So we started going down this hill and we’ve got to like 70, 75. 80. We’ve got to 85 and I can see the bottom approaching really quickly. And if it was just me, I would have probably gone a little bit quicker, but I’ve got this blind guy in the back, I can’t wipe out. So I had to start putting on the brakes.

And so we got, we matched 85, but we didn’t get to 86, which is what he was hoping for. But he was fine about it, but it was just, wow, that was hairy. I’ve never, yeah, to be 85 on a bike was kind of crazy.

[00:32:54] Helena Holrick: And isn’t that, I mean, in, in, in many ways, I mean, thank you for sharing. In many ways, that’s, that’s sort of a metaphor for life, isn’t it? Like, it’s, it’s like if we really let ourselves, whatever the obstacles or perceived obstacles that we might actually have, if we let ourselves, we could really go for it in all sorts of ways.

Whether that is in our health, in our reading, in our connections, in, in all of the different areas of our lives. We need to make a choice, don’t we? And, and I love the choice that you had. Like I could push it or I could just begin to slow down. And that is the choice that we have so much of the time, right?

[00:33:36] Tony Winyard: Absolutely. Yeah, if he hadn’t have been on the back, I would have definitely have gone faster.

But there’s no way I could have wiped him out.

[00:33:43] Helena Holrick: Yeah. Well, how, how wonderful.

[00:33:45] Lessons from Living in Different Countries

[00:33:45] Helena Holrick: And, uh, you know, I, I know that as you’ve just sort of hinted at, you’ve lived in a lot of countries, right?

[00:33:52] Tony Winyard: Yeah, 14.

[00:33:55] Helena Holrick: That’s quite a lot of cultural input. Because they’ve all been quite diverse as well. It’s not like you’ve just hopped around Europe, is it?

[00:34:04] Tony Winyard: Now I’ve had really extremes. I mean, from very rich countries like Japan and Switzerland, to, well, Japan was very rich at the time I was there anyway, to very poor countries like Indonesia and Syria. And so, I mean, they were complete opposites, you know, and then many countries in

[00:34:21] Helena Holrick: between.

Yeah. And what’s the one thing that you’ve seen that sort of unites people?

[00:34:28] The Power of People and Connections

[00:34:28] Tony Winyard: I, I think it doesn’t matter what country you go to, it’s the, it’s the people you’re with. Um, it’s the people you meet. Every country in some ways is the same. Every country has people that are great and really friendly and really hospitable and so on. And, I mean, like for example, when I was in Syria in the late 70s, late 80s rather, and At the time, Britain closed our embassy with Syria because of the Lockerbie, um, the shoe bomb and so on. And Britain had accused a Syrian guy of doing it. I can’t remember the whole story, but anyway, we didn’t have an embassy there. And the Daily Mail, as is their want, were daily painting Syrians as being really horrible people, and it was a horrible country, and it was full of terrorists and so on. They could not have been further from the truth because my experience there, they were so warm and friendly and people always invited me into their homes for, you know, to, and wouldn’t let me spend a penny.

I was playing for a football team there of the hotel I was working for. I was working for the most luxurious hotel in the whole of Syria. It was Sheraton Damascus at the time. And I played football for the hotel football team. Which was made up of the bellboys and cooks and, you know, and I was, it’s not an exaggeration to say I was probably earning more than all of them put together, probably three times more than all of them put together. And every time we would go to play football, it’s like, it’s really hot there. And, you know, it was sometimes it was, it’d be 45 degrees in, you know, um, fahrenheit or centigrade?

, I got mixed up, but it’s very hot anyway. And they’d bring loads of water and picnic and, yeah, it was like, it was like a feast every game. And after a couple of games, I said, look, you know, can I contribute towards it? And I remember one of the guys said, no, no, Tony, you’re our guest. And I said, yeah, yeah, okay, but I would still like to contribute. And then he started getting a little bit sterner. No, Tony, you’re our guest. I made one more effort and then he got really angry.

No, you are our guest. You do not pay. And it was just, you know, they were, they knew I was earning a lot more than them, but they’re, you know, they had the way they’re painted

by our press. It’s just so untrue. And, and every country I went to, I found, I think people everywhere are really friendly.

[00:36:45] Helena Holrick: yeah.

It’s, it’s… It’s amazing what you, you know, sort of opening and expanding your eyes to culture, to ideas, to just things that you can do or the ways that you can experience life is, is absolutely amazing. And I, I think that’s what you are about to sort of do with this next series, isn’t it, really? It’s, it’s, um, you’re about to get a little bit nerdy.

I think you’re about to share some stories.

[00:37:13] Tony Winyard: Yeah.

[00:37:14] The Influence of Eastern Medicine

[00:37:14] Tony Winyard: And also I just realized that my Being in the Far East for so long, because I was in the Far East for 10 years, and the way they, their approach to medicine and to health is very different to how we approach it in the West. And I didn’t realize how much it had affected me that, seeing that firsthand. And it’s only recently I realized, oh yeah, there’s a lot of those things that I was doing when I was there has affected my kind of approach and how I see I like, in many ways, their approach to health far more than our approach to health over here.

[00:37:50] Helena Holrick: Yeah, and I think, I think that may well be responsible for the fact that, uh, you mentioned birthdays and you mentioned that, you know, this is airing literally the day before your… Wanna tell people how old you are?

[00:38:05] Tony Winyard: The day this comes out, I’m going to be 60 tomorrow.

[00:38:09] The Impact of Age and Attitude

[00:38:09] Tony Winyard: And that always seems to amaze people when I meet them and say, Oh, people seem to think that I’m in my mid forties or even younger. Some people have got very bad eyesight. But, um, yeah, so I’m, I, I mean, I do, I play a lot of sport. I’m still faster than many guys, 20, 30 years younger than me when I’m playing football.

And I. A few, few months ago I discovered weightlifting for the first time and you, I don’t, I’m not really into wearing tight clothes but I’m, for the first time in my life, I’m really ripped. I’ve never ripped before. It’s crazy. And so, um, yeah, I seem to be, and it’s all about, it’s all in the mind anyway, age, isn’t it? And I’ve never had, because I’ve been a DJ most of my life, and I’ve been crazy about music, I obviously, I’m still friends with many people that I went to school with, like far more than most people. I, there’s probably about 30 or 40 people from my school, from my school year, who we meet up regularly. We meet, I meet up with many of them next week. But there’s many people who are the same age as me. Who think in a way that’s much older.

And they, they, uh, they have so many aches and pains and they’ve, they’ve almost accepted that, Oh, I’m in my sixties now. Um, that means I’m an old person and I don’t think like that at all. And I, I, um, and I don’t have any aches or pains.

And I think that’s a lot because I do just, I guess, so much sport and movement and yoga and Pilates and

[00:39:44] Helena Holrick: and you sleep well and I

think you are one of the walking, talking role models that I know of, you know, when you see someone who is so passionate about what they do and who’s thrown so so much attention into learning their craft, you know, the, the, the, the, the health and the habits and the way in which you hold them, you’re a walking, talking billboard for doing the things that you are saying that, that you’ve not only picked up on your travels, but that you’ve then kind of extensively trained on.

And I think there’s a lot to be said for just listening to someone. So I’m going to go back to you getting really nerdy and deep diving into the the tiniest things that that make a difference because it is like the little things that make a difference make a massive difference or have the potential to make a massive difference and again if we’re back to that scenario and I think a lot of people are I’ve certainly had to do this you know look after parents in their older age and just watching that happen you know which is which can be heartbreaking for some, you know, if we can, if you can actively start that revolution of It doesn’t have to be like that.

I know that’s really close to your heart. Is, is that fair to say? Is that kind of putting you up on a thing or just setting you a good challenge?

[00:41:07] Tony Winyard: yeah, I mean, well, I’ve got a one of the challenges that I’ve sort of set myself or and a tagline I’m gonna be using is I want to help a hundred people reach to be centenarians. Yeah So yeah, I do want to help people. It’s not actually about people getting to a hundred. That’s just a number It’s more about helping people be healthy for as long as possible So I mean like, you know, so that they’re only In a, maybe an unhealthy state for the last few weeks or months of their life, rather than as many people now, it’s like a decade or even more for most people in, in chronic disease and just having no dignity or freedom, you know, independence or whatever.

So yeah, so I want to help people with that. Um, and I, there was something I was just about to say and I can’t remember what it was, but

[00:42:01] Helena Holrick: Take your time. It’s all good because life is there to be enjoyed.

[00:42:07] Tony Winyard: Yeah, absolutely.

I go and watch quite a lot of comedy. I’m very much into stand up comedy, though. And I’ve performed quite a bit of stand up comedy, but I prefer to watch stand up comedy. But

[00:42:18] Helena Holrick: Well, so, so it sounds like, you know, sort of in the upcoming episodes, not only will there be a bunch of education, you deep diving and getting slightly nerdy around the things that you’ve got, probably sharing. One or three stories. And

[00:42:34] Tony Winyard: humorous way. Because I think that’s the difference.

[00:42:36] Helena Holrick: a

[00:42:37] Tony Winyard: some of these… Topics I’m very aware can be very dry. So I want to try and make them much more appealing to people and have, and try and integrate or bring a little bit of humor into each episode if I can.

[00:42:52] Helena Holrick: I could talk to you for a long, long while and I suspect that all I’m going to do instead is actually listen to what’s coming up. For those of you who are slightly newer to this, I would highly recommend, you know, the The tiny tips. So, so Tony has definitely helped me on a health level, uh, just live my life that little bit better.

Oddly enough, or not, through the breathing more than anything. So, um, I think there are lots of little things we can all do to set us on the road to that health span that you are talking about.

[00:43:30] Tony Winyard: I’ve remembered what it was I was going to

[00:43:32] Helena Holrick: I could see that.

[00:43:34] Tony Winyard: so, one of the things that I found very interesting in the last few years as I’ve done all these different courses. And for example, when I was doing the breathing course, um, And, and I know lots of breathwork instructors and, and there’s a particular group I’m on, uh, sort of, uh, an internet group for all these different breathing instructors. And no matter what problem someone has, breathing is the answer. And then I’m on this nutrition group for all these nutrition coaches. It doesn’t matter what problem someone has, nutrition is the answer. Same thing for sleep. Um, and what I’ve realized is, you know, it’s that man with a hammer, you know, everything’s in it.

for a man with a hammer, everything is a nail, or if it’s something like that.

[00:44:16] Helena Holrick: that’s the

[00:44:16] Tony Winyard: And in all of these different, it doesn’t matter what it is you learn, you think whatever it is that you’ve learned, that is the answer to everything when it comes to health anyway. But what I’ve realized is no, it’s not, it’s never any one thing.

It’s always, it’s many things. You can’t just address the one thing. It’s, it’s. You have to, you have to look at all these different things. You have to look at not just your nutrition, but your sleep, and your stress, and your movement, and your breathing, and so on.

[00:44:47] Helena Holrick: It’s wonderful.

So, Yeah, isn’t it just? And how, how wonderful that we get to live it and live it well, right?

Um, so I’m gonna turn the tables on you for one last time before you sort of begin to do this again. So I believe you always finish with a book that’s moved you. So with all the hundreds and thousands of books that you’ve read, what’s a book that’s moved you, Tony?

[00:45:14] Tony Winyard: This is crazy that I’m going to struggle to answer this when I ask people this every week.

[00:45:19] Helena Holrick: Now you know how they feel!

[00:45:19] The Importance of Sleep

[00:45:19] Tony Winyard: guess, I’ve read, I’ve literally read hundreds of books in the last few years, but I guess the one that stands out, and so it must be this is Matthew Walker, um, Why We Sleep. And, and I guess the reason why I’m saying this is because it’s the, the first book, or is the book that, as I read it more, and I read it a few times, and I realized just how important sleep is to our overall health.

I mean, I just went and said that it’s not one thing, it’s a combination of things. Sleep, I think, is the most important. And I remember I actually said to them, and I wrote it down, I am now making sleep my number one priority. And that was in 2020. I remember that. And since then I have, and even though I’m still DJing sometimes, and so sometimes I’m not getting home till very late, but I’m still, Um, sleep is my number one priority.

I mean, well, my daughter Bonnie is my number one priority, but as far as health is concerned, sleep is my number one priority. And I think because I make that such a priority, it’s one of the reasons why I am so healthy and I, I, I’m never ill. I don’t really, and I seemed, I’m, I’m usually, I don’t ever get depressed or in a bad mood, and I think sleep has got something to do with that. Um, you know, I’m charging my brain well.

[00:46:44] Helena Holrick: Yeah, I’m looking forward to the episode in which you talk about that is all I can say. So we’ve heard about the book. What about a quote that really resonates for you?

[00:46:57] The Power of Quotes

[00:46:57] Tony Winyard: Well, interestingly enough, and there’s a few people who have said this quote, who have been guests on this show. And it’s a quote that says there’s a space between stimulus and response, and in that space is our room for growth and freedom. And it’s always attributed to, uh, Viktor Frankl, but actually it wasn’t Viktor Frankl that said it. And it’s not clear who actually said it. And when, there’s, there’s a great website and I’ll put this in the show notes, there’s a great website called Quote Investigator, who goes really nerdy on these. There’s so many Einstein, there’s so many quotes attributed to Einstein, for example, which Einstein never said any of them.

[00:47:39] Helena Holrick: You mean he wasn’t as clever as we think he is?

[00:47:41] Tony Winyard: yeah, so this is one of those, those quotes. It’s always attributed to Viktor Frankl. But in Man’s Search for Meaning, he had an amazing book. He did say some things which are very similar to that, but he didn’t actually say those words. And in, uh, Stephen Covey’s book, Seven, uh, Habits of Highly Successful People, that’s where it seems to be first attributed to Viktor Frankl, because he says in that book, uh, Viktor Frankl said, but, and so when you look at this, um, article by Quote Investigator, he goes very deep into, who was it who actually said this?

And so anyway, it doesn’t, in some ways it doesn’t matter who said it, because it’s a fantastic quote.

[00:48:23] Helena Holrick: Yeah.

[00:48:24] Tony Winyard: since first reading that quote, I don’t know how many years ago it was, I think about it, I wouldn’t say daily, that’s not true, but I do think about it regularly and I am now.

[00:48:36] The Space Between Stimulus and Response

[00:48:36] Tony Winyard: I’ve worked on myself to make that pause much longer so I don’t have the default reaction I used to have. Because I used to do what most people do, you know, you’re driving and someone cuts you up and you start swearing at them as if they can hear you, you know. And all these things that you just do on a default, I don’t do on a default anymore. I now give myself time to think. and I’ll react differently.

[00:49:00] Helena Holrick: And do you have a tip? I’m sure there are a lot of people listening that are sort of going, how do you do that? What’s your tip for, for increasing the space between stimulus and response?

[00:49:13] Breathwork as a Tool for Response

[00:49:13] Tony Winyard: Well, it comes down to breathwork really, because the more you can be downregulated and more in that sort of parasympathetic state and more like more relaxed, you’re able to think more coherently. And that allows you to, that thing, how the stimulus happens and where you would normally just respond, actually. No. Was it, is, was that as bad as I, you know, do I need to be offended by that? Do I need to be angry about that? Do I, you actually give yourself time to think about your reaction rather than just having a reaction. And it’s not easy. It does take time.

[00:49:54] Developing Healthy Habits

[00:49:54] Tony Winyard: But if you, if you think about this a lot, and, but this is how it’s been for me anyway, I thought about this a lot for the last probably seven, eight years. And, and I, my. I do have a much bigger gap now between the stimulus and the response.

[00:50:10] Helena Holrick: So you’ve developed that habit beautifully.

[00:50:12] Tony Winyard: Yeah, I guess so. Yeah.

Yeah,

[00:50:14] Helena Holrick: how wonderful. Well, as I say, you’re a walking, talking example of all that you talk about. And I am definitely looking forward to hearing much more.

[00:50:25] Closing Remarks and Gratitude

[00:50:25] Helena Holrick: So I wish you all the best with the new series. Long may it continue.

[00:50:31] Tony Winyard: Well, and thank you, Helena, for all that you’ve done for me. And you’ve done so much for me over the last, was it five years, I think, since we first

met. And yeah, you were a guest four years ago. So I really want to give a big thank you to you because you’ve been a massive help. So thank you.

[00:50:47] Helena Holrick: you are so welcome,

[00:50:49] Tony Winyard: Thank you, Helena.

Well listeners, we’ve reached the final episode of The Art of Living Proactively I can’t quite believe this marvelous journey is drawing to an end, after 250 thought provoking installments. But don’t despair. I return next week, with an exhilarating new vision. Welcome 360 degrees of health span, where I provide practical pearls to optimize your longevity.

We’ll be exploring every angle of whole person health, not just the physical, but also mental, emotional, social, and spiritual. I’m overflowing with fervour to share this fresh focus with you all culminates years of researching lifestyle medicine, and seeing firsthand how small, consistent actions reap massive rewards. So do join me on this quest to help you sculpt sustainable habits across all facets of life. Let’s revel together in the adventure of becoming our best selves.

I sincerely believe these bite-sized episodes will prove invaluable. They’ll be around about 10 minutes, each something along those lines. Please do subscribe on your favorite podcast platform. Leave sparkling reviews. Share posts with friends and comment on our YouTube channel. Your support means the world to me. So one last time, I thank you profoundly for making this such a special community to nurture. Here’s to many more mutually meaningful moments on the road ahead.

Hope you have a great weekend.